The Collegian

Letter to the Editor: Math Department made poor choice with new computer program, says reader

staff

November 1, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Dear Math Department staff and The Collegian editor-in-chief, I am writing today out of disappointment with the new system of Computer-based Mastery Program courses that the Math department has chosen to implement for Math 021 and Math 101 this semester, and apparently will continue with Math 102 next s...

Are there no objectors out there to the commonality of war?

Jon Weiler

November 1, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Jon WeilerColumnist I hear her voice starting to crack, "I wake up each day and I have to find reasons to get out of bed. It's getting harder and harder to do." My feeble response of, "It will eventually be ok," was met with her very sad, "I don't think it will be." I am an Iraq War Veteran. I was pa...

There was no transcendental experience, just an anthill

Keith Brumley

November 1, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Keith BrumleyColumnist I was hitchhiking to the West Coast and back during the last month of summer vacation. I'd been given lifts by a treasure hunter, an economics professor, a vacationing couple from South Dakota and a police officer who'd been kind enough to shuttle me from the east to the west s...

Super Student Lesson V: Hobo Day, Hobo Yea!

Tony Reiss

October 26, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Tony ReissSuper Student Hobo Day. Or is it Hobo Days, Hobo Daze or Hobo Week? It seems that there is no consensus on what to call the biggest one day celebration in the Dakotas. Perhaps the Alumni Association could take up the cause of creating an official name (just make sure it is socio-economic n...

Afghanistan: Test Ground for hope?

Keith Brumley

October 26, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Keith Brumley?Columner? It's never what you think. Spin doctors from the U.S. and NATO paint a picture of slow but consistent progress in the battle against Afghan insurgents and a steady progression toward representational democracy. Afghan citizens however, may see it another way. Matthew Natuli, a f...

Uninformed voting is irresponsible voting

staff

October 26, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Issue: Organizations often stress the importance of voting but rarely the importance of responsible voting. Every election cycle, groups and organizations orchestrate get-out-the-vote campaign, stressing the need to vote. Voting is a huge responsibility, and many of these groups urgently stress the utmost ...

Debate on Tax Reform

Kyle Vande Weerd

October 18, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Kyle Vande WeerdGuest Columnist In 1945, the peak income tax rate was 94 percent. Marginalized income tax rates have been declining since 1953. Despite this almost constant decline in tax rates, federal revenues have continued to rise both in real dollars as well as a percentage of the Gross Domestic Product. We have also seen the number of tax brackets decrease from 15 in 1981 to six brackets today. During that same time period the tax rate for the lowest bracket fell from a high of 15 percent to it's present 10 percent rate of gross income; the top tax bracket fell from 70 percent to 35 percent. Reaganomics is much maligned by today's left who claim that the lost revenues could have been used to not only pay off our debts but also put every American through college free of charge; such an argument is contradicted by the numbers. Despite a drastic cut in tax rates, government revenues increased by $400 billion during Reagan's time in office. How could this paradox exist ... how can lowering tax rates lead to an increase in revenues? The answer is efficiency. Individuals and private corporations are more responsible with money than the government. This is not an indictment of our system of government - the same system has made America into an economic, military, and scientific juggernaut &- this is simply a cold reality of the human condition. Governments are more cavalier with tax dollars just as people playing with house money are more likely to bet big at a casino. Another characteristic of being human is greed. Many people would argue that wealthy, greedy business owners will simply pocket whatever money they save from a lower tax rate ... and some of them will, just as some government officials will accept bribes or funnel money to their personal interests. The smart but greedy, wealthy business owner will re-invest their savings into their business, expanding either horizontally or vertically, hiring new employees, providing a service more efficiently than the government. Expansion of business ultimately means economic growth, which leads to increased revenue because even though the government is taking a smaller percentage, the base from which it draws that money is larger. The Laffer curve has only existed within the minds of Western economists for about 40 years, but Arab scholars were experimenting with this idea seven centuries ago when Europe was just beginning to emerge from the Dark Ages and Baghdad was the center of the intellectual world. For those unfamiliar with the Laffer curve, it is a hypothetical projection of government revenues based on rates of taxation. The Laffer curve uses a parabolic projection to show that at a 0 percent tax rate the government will see zero revenue but at a 100 percent tax rate the government will also see zero dollars in revenue because people would find other means of trade (bartering) without the use of currency. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the United States would see peak revenues with an income tax from 32-35 percent. According to the non-partisan CBO, we already have the theoretical maximum tax rate, which would support the greatest level of revenue for the federal government. A further increase in tax rates would not lead to increased revenues. Since 1980, over 40 countries have seen a decrease in marginalized income taxes, including Sweden, a country which is villainized by the right and heralded by the left for their progress tax and economic systems. Kyle Vande Weerd is a student at SDSU and a member of the Political Science Club. Contact Kyle at [email protected]

Many seem ?eager? to put faith in God, fear putting it in fellow humans

Hannah McDermet

October 18, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Hannah McdermetDeviant Ink Slinger "Thank God!" This phrase has infused itself into our everyday language. "Thank God you're here." "Thank God he wasn't hurt." "Thank God she found her saucepan." It seems like you cannot go a single day without hearing about all the amazing things God, or any other de...

Improper stretching before workouts can lead to serious injury

Kyle Kranz

October 18, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Kyle KranzRunning on the white Line As an ultra marathoner and triathlete I spend way too much time at the Wellness Center. One of the most common activities I notice is how people warm up and stretch incorrectly before exercising. The most common warm up is a couple very brief leg stretches, five minut...

Prayer and worship in Mass ease midterm stress

Father Andrew Dickinson

October 18, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Father Andrew DickinsonColumnist It is Homecoming and Hobo Day is almost here. It is near midterm and tests are piling up. Job fairs. Summer internships. As students there are so many ways that you are daily called to give, work, study and strive. I am feeling a little down my effort in Professor Tol...

SA petition shows integrity

staff

October 18, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Issue: The Students' Association recently passed a resolution to petition Brookings City Council for $15,000 from third penny tax in funding to SDSU. The third penny, or 3B tax, levees taxes . The City of Brookings has the power to impose this third penny tax, which taxes leisurely expenditures like pr...

Minimalist running movement and those weird toe shoe things

Kyle Kranz

October 5, 2010


Filed under Opinion

Kyle KranzColumnist You may have seen them around campus or maybe you saw the featured article at the Yahoo.com home page while checking your email. Those funky looking toe shoes are not just totally cool looking, but part of the biggest thing to happen to running since Nike was founded in 1964. In the...