Wisdom to be passed on

ENDRA DAVIS Columnist

I had the joy of getting my wisdom teeth out this past Monday. Before my surgery, I was in pain because of the unnecessary teeth trying to grow in my mouth because it was too small.

I asked many people how their wisdom teeth extractions went and got a cornucopia of replies from “didn’t hurt a bit. I was up and running around by the next day,” to “it was one of the worst things I have ever experienced. I was not able to eat normal food for weeks.”

You can imagine hearing about these different experiences made me pretty nervous for what was to come. In the end, I decided that it was unavoidable and the experience depended on the person.

I went to bed Sunday night before my appointment a little nervous, not really knowing what the next morning would bring. 

We arrived at the oral surgeon’s office Monday morning and soon I was in the chair getting an IV in my arm. The last thing I remember was asking the doctor if he was going to tell me when he was going to start putting me to sleep and all he said was “I’ve already started.”

I woke up with big tears rolling down my cheeks, crying for no reason. The nurse said that was normal and soon my mom and I were on our way back home.

The first day, the pain was pretty bad. I could not let my cheeks touch anything and I looked like a chipmunk.

The worst thing about getting your wisdom teeth out is not being able to eat anything other than soft foods. My diet this past week has consisted mostly of yogurt, pudding, applesauce and ice cream.

All I want right now is a very large and juicy cheeseburger, some french fries and to drink a chocolate malt through a straw. Unfortunately, I cannot do these things for a couple more days.

Getting my wisdom teeth out is not the worst thing that has ever happened to me, but as for the list of annoying things I am glad I only have to do once in my life, it is definitely right at the top.

For those of you getting your wisdom teeth out in the future: do not worry, it will not be that bad. Just do not smoke, drink through a straw or chew any gum. If at all possible, eat all of the cheeseburgers you can before the day of your surgery.

 

Kendra Davis is an agriculture communications major at SDSU and can be reached at [email protected]