The Collegian

Top five Hobo Week traditions

MIRANDA+SAMPSON%0APresident+Barry+Dunn+spoke+at+Rally+at+the+Rails+encouraging+people+to+enjoy+the+rest+of+Hobo+Week+on+Oct.+8+in+the+Volstorff+Ballroom.
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Top five Hobo Week traditions

MIRANDA SAMPSON
President Barry Dunn spoke at Rally at the Rails encouraging people to enjoy the rest of Hobo Week on Oct. 8 in the Volstorff Ballroom.

MIRANDA SAMPSON President Barry Dunn spoke at Rally at the Rails encouraging people to enjoy the rest of Hobo Week on Oct. 8 in the Volstorff Ballroom.

MIRANDA SAMPSON

MIRANDA SAMPSON President Barry Dunn spoke at Rally at the Rails encouraging people to enjoy the rest of Hobo Week on Oct. 8 in the Volstorff Ballroom.

MIRANDA SAMPSON

MIRANDA SAMPSON

MIRANDA SAMPSON President Barry Dunn spoke at Rally at the Rails encouraging people to enjoy the rest of Hobo Week on Oct. 8 in the Volstorff Ballroom.

Danielle Sons

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Students, alumni and fans from all over are gearing up for South Dakota State University’s biggest event: Hobo Day.

Before the big day, there are many traditions during the week that are tied to making Hobo Day more enjoyable.

Here are some of the most popular traditions sure to pump up anyone’s school spirit.

5. Rally at the Rails

This year, Rally at the Rails was moved to the Volstorff Ballroom due to inclement weather, but that didn’t take away from its intended purpose.

“[It’s a] great kick-off to pump everyone up for Hobo Week,” said Genesis Duarte, a senior political science and Spanish major.

Events and games like pie in the face, a chili competition and relay races make up the bulk of this tradition.

4. Bum-A-Meal

Bum-A-Meal is a loved traditions by SDSU students, probably because it includes free home-cooked meals.

The event involves students going around to community members’ homes dressed as hobos, in traditional Hobo Day spirit, and bumming a free meal.

“This is my favorite tradition because it shows how connected the community and university are together,” said Alex Denevan, who serves as the Hobo Day Committee transportation coordinator.

Food that community members typically serve varies.

“At one house they could just be serving you pizza, and at others you get a five-course meal,” Assistant Pooba for Marketing Miranda O’Bryan said.

However, no matter what kind of food is served, the event is all about getting to know one another and getting the opportunity to strengthen or even start a long-lasting relationship with community members.

3. Hobolympics

Hobolympics is a competitive event where students can earn some extra cash and participate in a series of relays.

At the end of the relays, prizes are split between each team of four. First place will take home a $240 cash prize, second place wins $120 and third place receives $60.

There are other surprise prizes for the team with the best costume, best spirit and most effort.

Prizes can range from other money prizes to Hobo Day buttons. Hobolympics takes place from 4:30-7 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 10 on Sylvan Green near the Coughlin Campanile.

2. Mr. and Ms. Homelycoming

This event is where some of the bravest and most outgoing students fight it out for the title of Mr. and Ms. Homelycoming, a pageant-style competition.

The only catch about this event is that men have to dress up as women, and women have to dress up as men, as well as having to come up with a creative and outgoing personality as a way to woo the judges into casting their final votes on them.

Having to perform a talent as well as participate in other entertaining events such as a swimsuit competition makes Mr. and Ms. Homelycoming one of the most popular events during Hobo Week.

Doors open at 6:15 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10 in the Performing Arts Center.

Students can purchase tickets at Information Exchange in the Student Union for $3. Public tickets are $5.

1. Hobo Day Parade

A parade where everyone including alumni, locals, students and faculty all gather together and bask in their love for SDSU.

A variety of clubs and organizations on campus make floats and walk in the parade early Saturday morning.

They have the opportunity to sign up to show off their homemade floats and banners, advertise themselves and even hand out candy.

“This is by far my favorite tradition. It’s truly an amazing event to be a part of, and the energy is crazy,” O’Bryan said. “Even though it’s usually super chilly, everyone gets so hyped we forget about it as soon as the floats ride into view.”

Make sure to show up in blue and yellow and support SDSU floats when they start marching at 9:30 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 13. The parade begins at Medary Avenue, travels down to Sixth Street and ends on Main Avenue.

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