“Sexy Feast” brings food, sex-ed to campus

“L-L-L-Lick me like a lollipop” bumping from the speakers, the crisp aroma of chicken wings, pizza and donuts floating throughout The Union and a sex education talk came together for the “Sexy Feast” event.

The University Program Council (UPC) hosted the event Thursday, Sept. 15, to educate students about sex, dating, love and relationships.

Helen Conzemius, UPC vice president, said the event was “definitely successful with 108 students in attendance.”

The speaker, Jay Friedman, a certified sex educator, food critic and professional writer, talked about how humans are “sexual beings,” no matter what their sexual orientation is, and there is nothing wrong with it.

He advocated for open communication about sex and found a way to tie certain foods to common sex-related topics. Friedman said he chose this comparison method to make the conversation about sex more lighthearted and fun for students.

For example, at one point in his presentation he talked about bagels. His slogan for this slide was “Kegels with your Bagels” where he discussed the importance of doing daily kegels, an exercise to strengthen your pelvic muscles to increase pleasure during sex, while eating your bagel in the morning.

He said doing kegels multiple times a day, whether in the morning or later in the day, can be beneficial for sex life.

UPC Lectures and Forums Coordinator Logan Johnson said he was excited to have Friedman talk on campus because it was a “fun, new way” to talk about sex that SDSU hasn’t had in previous years.

At one point in his lecture he discussed ramen, a well-known meal among college students. Ramen relates to sex because “even when you’re broke, you can have a good time,” Friedman said.

He spoke of serious issues as well. One such issue was consent. He related this to chicken wings and how some restaurants will require you to sign a waiver before eating their hot wings.

“Just like those restaurants, you must receive consent from your partner,” Friedman said.

Following the event, students expressed positive feelings toward the lecture, Conzemius said.

“They liked the different approach he had with food,” Conzemius said. “They (the audience) were laughing and engaged the entire time.”